VS2011 “Reimagined” – Class View

Note: The below is an attempt to contribute to the discussion around Visual Studio vNext and what I think personally should eventuate into features for future generations of Visual Studio. The objective behind this is not to declare the UI examples as “done” but more to provoke a discussion around ways in which the tool itself could become more intelligent and contextually relevant to not just developers but also those of us who can do both design and code. I plan on compiling this into a more comprehensive document post public feedback.

Situation.

Today, the ClassView inside Visual Studio is pretty much useless for most parts, in that when you sit down inside the tool and begin stubbing out your codebase (initial file-new creation) you are probably in the “creative” mode of object composition.

Visual Studio in its current and proposed form does not really aid you in a way that makes sense to your natural approach to writing classes. That is to say, all it really can do is echo back to you what you’ve done or more to the point give you a “at a glance view” only.

Improvement.

The class view itself should have a more intelligent by design visual representation. When you are stubbing or opening an existing class, the tool should reflect more specifics around not only what the class composition looks like (at a glance view) but also should enable developers to approach their class designs in a more interactive fashion. The approach should enable developer(s) to hide and show methods, properties and so on within the class itself, meaning “get out of my way, I need to focus on this method for a minute” which in turn keeps the developer(s) focused on the task.

The ClassViewer should also make it quick to comment out large blocks of code, display visual issues relating to the large blocks of code whilst at the same time highlight which parts of the codes have and don’t have Attributes/Annotations attached.

Furthermore, the ClassViewer should also allow developer(s) to integrate their source and task tracking solutions (TFS) via a finite way, that is to say enable both overall class level commentary and “TODO” allocation(s). At the same time have similar approaches at a finite level such as “property, method, or other” areas of interest – (i.e. “TODO: this method is not great code, need to come back refactor this later”).

Feature breakdown.

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The above is the overall fantasy user interface of what a class viewer could potential look like. Keeping in mind the UI itself isn’t accommodate every single use-case, but simply hints at the direction I am talking about.

Navigation.

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Inside the ClassView there are the following Navigational items that represent different states of usage.

Documentation
TBA.

Stats
TBA.

Usage by
TBA.

Derived By

The “Derived By” view enables developers to gain a full understanding of how a class handles known inheritance chain by displaying a visual representation of how it relates to other interfaces and classes.

Minimap

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This inheritance hierarchy will outline specifically how the classes’ relationship model would look like within a given solution (obviously only indexing classes known within an opened solution).

  • The end user is able to jump around inside the minimap view; to get an insight into what metadata (properties, methods etc.) is associated with each class without having to open the said class.
  • The end user is able to gain a satellite view what is inside each class via the Class Properties panel below the minimap.

Class Properties.

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Interactive Elements.

  • The end user is able to double click on a minmap box (class file representation) and as such, the file will open directly into the code view area.
  • The end user is able to select each field, property, method etc. within the Class Properties data grid. Each time the user selects that specific area and If the file is opened, the code view will automatically position the cursor to the first character within that specific code block.
  • The end user is able to double click on the image first circle to indicate that this code block should be faded back to allow the developer to focus on other parts of the code base. When the circle turns red, the code block itself foreground colour will fade back to a passive state (i.e. all grey text) as whilst this code is still visible and compliable, it however visually isn’t displayed in a prominent state.
  • The end user is able to click on the image second circle to indicate that the code block itself should take on a breakpoint behaviour (when debugging please stop here). When the circle turns red, it will indicate that a debug breakpoint is in place. The circle itself right click context will also take on an as-is behavior found within Visual Studio we see today.
  • The end user is able to click on the image Tick icon (grey off, green on). If the Tick state is grey, this indicates that this code block has been commented out and is in a disabled state (meaning as per commenting code it will not show up at compile time).
  • The end user is able to click on the image Eye icon to switch the code block into either a private or public state (public is considered viewable outside the class itself, ie internal vs public are one in the same but will respect the specifics within the code itself).

Stateful Display.

  • Each row will indicate the name given to the property, its return or defined type, whether or not it is public or private and various tag elements attached to its composition.
  • When a row has a known error attached within its code block, the class view will display a red indication that this area needs the end users attention.
  • The image eye icon represents whether or not this class has been marked for public or private usage (i.e. public is considered whether the class is viewable from outside the class itself – ie internal is considered “viewable” etc.).
  • Tags associated to the row indicate elements of interest, in that the more additional per code block features built in, they will in turn display here (e.g.: Has Data Annotations, Codeblock is Read Only, Has notes attached etc.).

Tags.

My thinking is that development teams can attach tabs to each code block whilst at the same time the code itself will reflect what I call “decorators” that have been attached (ie attributes).

Example Tags.

  • image Attribute / Annotation. This tag will enable the developer to see at a glance as to what attributes or annotations are attached to this specific code block. This is mainly useful from a developer(s) perspective to ensure whether or not the class itself has the right amount of attributes (oops I forgot one?) whilst at the same time can provide an at-a-glance view as to what types of dependencies this class is likely to have (e.g use case Should EntityFramework Data Annotations be inside each POCO class? Or should it be handled in the DBContext itself?..before we answer that, lets see what code blocks have that dependency etc.).
  • image Locked. This ones a bit of a tricky concept, but initially the idea is to enable development teams to lock specific code blocks from other developer(s) manipulation, that is to say the idea is that when a developer is working on a specific set of code chunks and they don’t want other developer(s) to touch, they can insert code-locks in place. This in turn will empower other developer’s to still make minor modification(s) to the code whilst at the same time, check in the code itself but at the same time removing resolution conflicts at the end of the overall work stream (although code resolution is pretty simplified these days, this just adds an additional layer of protecting ones sandpit).
  • image Notes. When documenting issues within a task or bug, it’s at times helpful to leave traces behind that indicate or warn other developers to be careful of xyz issues within this code block (make sure you close out your while loop, make sure you clean-up your background threading etc.). The idea here is that developer(s) can leave both class and code-block specific notes of interest.
  • Insert Your idea here. These tag specific features outlined so far aren’t the exhausted list, they are simply thought provokers as to how far one can go within a specific code-block. The idea is to leverage the power Visual Studio to take on a context specific approach to the way you interact with a classes given composition. The tags themselves can be injected into the code base itself or they can simply reside in a database that surrounds the codebase (ie metdata attached outside of the physical file itself).

Discussion Points..

  • The idea behind this derived by and class properties view is that the way in which developer(s) code day in day out takes on a more helpful state, that is to say you are able to make at-a-glance decisions on what you see within the code file itself. At the same time providing a mini-map overarching view as to what the composition of your class looks like – given most complex classes can have a significant amount of code in place?
  • Tagging code-chunks is a way of attaching metadata to a given class without specifically having to pollute the class’s actual composition, these could be attachments that are project or solution specific or they can be actual code manipulation as well (private flipped to public etc.). The idea is simply to enable developer(s) to communicate with one another in a more direct and specific fashion whilst at the same time enable the developer(s) to shift their coding lense to enable them to zero in on what’s important to them at the time of coding (ie fading the less important code to a grey state).

Going forward, throw your ideas into the mix, how would you see this as being a positive or negative way forward?